What Revolution?

Jennifer Jordan

Jennifer Jordan is the senior editor at www.savoreachglass.com. With a vast knowledge of wine etiquette, she writes articles on everything from how to hold a glass of wine to how to hold your hair back after too many glasses. Ultimately, she writes her articles with the intention that readers will remember wine is fun and each glass of anything fun should always be savored.

Often it is that whimsical and hopeful part of us that likes to believe we live in new, exciting and changing times. But, while our version of new, exciting and changing may certainly be manifested in a different way than the version our grand parents and great-grand parents experienced, it is nevertheless the nature of human invention and creativity to constantly live in new, exciting and changing times. This is not so with Wine Making. For largely the last thousand years, wine making used the same methods and acted upon the same biases. Now - today - that is all changing before our eyes. We really are living in new, exciting and changing times in the world of wine.

Wine

While the last thirty years have been but a blip on the radar screen in the long history of wine production, they will surely be marked as the time when everything changed. What does this mean? It means that while grape growing has been taking place in different parts of the world for quite some time, this is the time when relatively new wineries like those in the United States, Australia, New Zealand, South America and even South Africa are bringing something new to the table. For the first time history, there is the actual study of wine making and wine growing emerging as a scientific field in its own right, thanks to the efforts of places like U.C. Davis in California. Similarly, new technological innovations are making it possible to produce white wines that are as demanding, complex and elegant as their red wine brethren who have dominated the scene since the very first grape fermentations.

The crux of the revolution is the meeting of ideas. It is the old world of wine making meeting the new world of wine making. Old world wine growers like those in France, Italy and Spain founded a tradition based on the notion of terrior - that a wine's character and complexity comes from the land in which the grapes are grown; that everything heavenly about wine comes from a single plot of land that is different in ways too vast and subtle to fully understand; that the vineyard is a sacred work of subtlety.

The new world, on the other hand, is trying to make itself heard. True to the pioneering spirit that drove immigrants from all over the globe to settle in places like the United States, new world wines are full of big ideas and big innovations. The new world has helped turn wine growing and wine making into a science (viticulture and viniculture respectively). It has also renewed an interest in exploring the depth and excitement in individual grape varietals, rather than focusing on mixing and matching. Perhaps most importantly, it has encouraged the old world vineyards to break out of their shells and start taking some risks.

The meeting of these two ideas is profound. New options are coming to the table everyday for wine makers, and where the fear of having only twenty to thirty seasons in a career to get it right used to be paralyzing, now it is invigorating. The new wine maker in today's wine culture is the master of his or her destiny, equipped with the tools and knowledge to know what went right and what went wrong in the past, and what might be possible tomorrow.

The Wine Drinking Revolution

The revolution is not just occurring in the wine making arena, it is happening at out dinner tables. Wine has had a tendency to carry with it a stigma of elitism and snobbery. This is particularly true for countries like the United States that are unfamiliar with the European style of enjoying wine. All over the world, it was believed that to truly understand and enjoy wine you had to embark on a lifelong quest to memorize vineyards and grapes. The whole thing sounded encyclopedic and academic – something that goes against the very heart of the role wine can play in our every day lives.

Today, it is true that there is more information than ever available on wine. The internet is partly responsible, but so are the many wonderful wine lovers across the globe that are writing books, publishing magazines and starting wine shops in a way that embraces the idea that wine is for everyone. Even sommeliers are less likely to be snobs - egging you on to buy an expensive bottle of wine you should like, and more likely to get to know you, your tastes and your budget and offer some friendly suggestions.

For countries outside of Europe, the idea that wine is a part of every day life, like the sunset, is starting to take hold. Something that was once reserved for special occasions is now being enjoyed daily without the anxiety and foreboding that used to accompany it. Walking into a wine merchant is even becoming a pleasant experience, as new style wine merchants, like new style sommeliers, are more friendly, more educated and more informative than ever.

And how can we look over the internet! The internet has served to not only make volumes of information available at the click of a button, but it has also offered new opportunities to the wine consumer like wine clubs. There's no better way to get to know the world of wine than having reputable merchants hand-pick wines from all over the world and send them to you with tasting notes.

This is also the part where the revolution in wine making and the revolution in wine drinking collide: more high quality wines from more places in the world are available at prices lower than ever. Finding an enjoyable and distinctive $10 bottle of wine is now not only possible, but actually easy!

 
Sort by
  • ClaireElizabeth says
    Personally, either it tastes good or it doesn't and I find people who go into depth about nutty, fruity,bold flavours etc etc, to be the most boring people on the planet, like everyone else whos only subject of conversation is alcohol and how much they drink of it. And as for making it cheaper, well I've seen plenty of wino's in my life from all classes of life, who use the excuse that it is a nice 'glass'(or 5)of wine to relax after work.
    • Cinty says
      I really do agree with you on this one! It's easy to say whether or not you like the taste of someone and you don't need to go on about it. It can be sweet, bitter or whatever but who cares? We all have different tastes!
    • Claire1971 says
      Ah, the psychological '$10 or under a bottle' price tolerance. It's still alive and kicking, and with the current glut of wine worldwide, and especially in New Zealand, it's very rare to end up with something that isn't perfectly quaffable!
    • KH says
      I was brought up around wine. A little more like they tend to do in Europe.

      The more you've tried the more you notice what flavours are behind the wine and what sort of food different wine goes best with. I appreciate the bold, fruity (etc) flavours.

      Most people can talk in-depth about their favourite topics. I don't have a problem if that topic is wine, specially not if I get to enjoy a glass or two while hearing about it.
    • Wice says
      I'm with you on this KH. We used to drink wine with dinner every day as children (diluted less and less as we got older ) and you became so familiar with the nuances. Even as a ten year old I could probably have told, by sipping, the name and year one our regular wines was made. I didn't think knowing about wine was anything special. It was not done to impress but just like talking about the vegetables or the meat that was served - whether they were young, fresh, juicy, ripe, aged, dry, etc. You could like or dislike any part of the meal . It is natural to make comparisons, whether of wine or food, between different time you had tasted it and between similar wines or foods.

      I do hate people that go on and on about wines to others in an effort to impress them. It always reminds me of people who discuss their particular religious beliefs in an effort to convince others of the 'right' way.

      Of course, everyone either likes or dislikes a particular wine to varying degrees. But like chocolate mousse, the more mousses you sample, the more you begin to realise which ones taste and feel and smell and look the best! The more you know, the more you appreciate.
    • StillMe says
      I believe that if more families approached wine as yours did (KH and Wice) we probably wouldn't have this obsessive cultural attraction to alcohol (read: getting plastered) that we have in New Zealand. I think the worst thing we can do it make it a taboo.

      My daughter is half Spanish so I figured that she could handle watered down wine at a young age but unfortunately she hated it.
    • joyus2 says
      Wine either tastes good or doesn't. Not really interested in all the hubbub.
    • New Member says
      I love drinking wine while playing Marvel future fight so if you want to hack marvel future check this website and get marvel future generator



    • New Member says
      Yeezy Blue Tint
      Balenciaga UK
      Nike Air Max 270
      Cheap Basketball Jerseys
      NFL Official Store
      Balenciaga UK
      Yeezy Supply
      NFL Jerseys
      Basketball Jerseys
      Nike Air Max 2017
      Nike Air Max 270
      Cheap NFL Jerseys
      Nike Air
      NFL Jerseys
      Yeezy Boost 350 V2
      Birkenstock
      Cheap NFL Jerseys From China
      NFL Shop Official Online Store
      Nike Shoes
      Balenciaga UK
      Salomon UK
      Yeezy
      Salomon
      Nike Shoes For Men
      Nike Factory Outlet Store Online
      Nike Outlet Store
      Kyrie Irving Jersey
      Balenciaga
      Nike UK
      Air Max 270
      Moncler UK
      Off White Jordan 1
      jordan 4
      Yeezy Shoes
      Birkenstocks Shoes
      Yeezy
      Nike Outlet Store Online Shoping
      Balenciaga Triple S
      Salomon Shoes
      Nike Air Max
      Nike Outlet Online
      Balenciaga Trainers
      Birkenstock Sandals
      Nike Shoes
      Balenciaga
      Birkenstocks
      Moncler UK
      Yeezy Supply
      Salomon UK
      Adidas Yeezy
      Jordan 12
      Air Max 97
      Nike Kyrie Irving Jersey
      Nike Outlet Store
      Cheap NFL Jerseys
      Birkenstock Shoes
      Yeezy Boost 350
      NBA Jerseys
      jordan 12 bordeaux
      Win Like 82
      Yeezy Blue Tint
      Yeezy Shoes
      Nike Air
      Yeezy Shoes
      Moncler Jackets
      Nike Air Max
      Nike Outlet
      Salomon UK
      jordan 12 ovo
      Jordan 11 Win Like 82
      Air Max 270
      Oakley Outlet
      Air Max 270
      Yeezy
      Jordan 11 Win Like 82
      Yeezy Boost 350 V2
      Nike Air Max 270
      Nike Factory Outlet
      Nike Outlet Store
      Birkenstock Sandals
      Air Max 270
      Air Max 270
      Nike Clearance
      Yeezy Boost 350
      nike clearance
      Nike NBA Jerseys
      Cheap NBA Jerseys
      Yeezys
      Cheap NFL Jerseys
      Salomon Speedcross 4
      Nike Outlet Store Online Shipping
      Air Max 2017
      NBA Jerseys
      Balenciaga UK

    Post your comment

    Want to have your say?

    It's quick, easy and 100% free.

    •  

    Features

    Endorsed Events

    • SpringBreakFIJI SpringBreakFIJI

      Secure your motivation for the year by locking in SpringBreak in Fiji, your own exclusive island

    • The Fijian Cup The Fijian Cup

      The Pacific Touch Rugby festival (Fijian Cup and Kava Cup) is underway on November 2, 2017 and with support from Touch Fiji and...

    • Rock Island VANUATU Rock Island VANUATU

      From a fully chartered resort, an incredible line up of Kiwi musicians and Rock legends flown in you'll find nothing close to...

    • Summit FIJI Summit FIJI

      Summit FIJI aims to revolutionise how businesses can approach conferences, corporate retreats and team building weekends