Write a Wedding Thank-You Card

Ashley Rader

Ashley Rader is the owner of Moments of Elegance, an online wedding boutique specializing in beach wedding favors, summer wedding favors and a huge collection of unique wedding favor ideas that will say thank you with style and will truly make your event unforgettable.

There is truly an etiquette involved in writing the thank-you cards for your wedding and shower gifts. A lot of bride's make the mistake of sending thank-you cards that are either pre-printed or not quite appropriate, especially if they haven't sent a lot of thank-you cards and are not even quite sure how to start. Or maybe you're a bride that is worried that you've waited to long to send them and it's too late, but while its important to send thank-you cards promptly, a late thank-you card is always better than no thank-you card at all. That is why you should follow these few simple tips when writing your thank-you notes to help you get started.

A Modern Vintage Australian Wedding-Thank You Cards

1.)    Appropriately address the giver. Always start your thank-you note with, "Dear Aunt _____________" or "Dear Mr. and Mrs. _____________".  This is the first reason why you should have someone keep a list of gifts and givers when you are opening your wedding or shower gifts.

2.)    Get personal. "Thank-you for your gift." is not personal or appropriate when sending a thank-you card. You should always thank them specifically for the gift and how you are using it. For instance you could say, "Thank-you for the wonderful coffee pot. Jim and I love starting our day with a fresh pot of coffee." or "Thank-you for the lamp and lamp shade. It looks great in our bedroom and allows me to read without disturbing Jim." If you receive money as a gift, you should never state the amount or say "cash" or "money" when writing your thank-you card. A great way to give thanks for money is to say something like, "Thank-you for your generous gift. We're putting it towards purchasing the new bedroom set we've been wanting." You could give thanks for a gift card in the same manner, " Thank-you for the Target gift card. We can't wait to use it to purchasing the steak knives we registered for, but did not receive."

3.)    Don't just thank them for the gift; thank them for attending your wedding or shower. By thanking them for attending, it lets them know that their presence was noticed and appreciated.

4.)    It's not about you. Try to keep the words "I", "we", "me", or "our" out of it as much as possible. Remember the key is to make the thank-you card about the gift giver. This is not the appropriate way to share honeymoon details.

5.)    Always end your note with "Love," or "Sincerely," depending on how close you are to the gift giver. You should also sign the card in both you and your spouse's names. For instance, "Love, Jim and Elaine" or "Sincerely, Jim and Elaine Roberts". A formal closing is always important, and even if your spouse isn't helping you write the thank-you cards, it is important to include him in the note to show his gratefulness for their gift as well.

A thank-you card is, after all, the least you can do to express your gratitude toward the gift giver for taking the time to select a personal gift and for sharing in your special day. Every new couple needs to know they have support, and every person who purchases a gift for you and attends your wedding is doing so to show their support as you and your spouse embark on this new journey together.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/3020376

 
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  • Wice says
    There are lots of ways of showing appreciation but I'm all for thank you cards whenever someone goes out of their way for you.The small effort involved, creates something that can be kept and cherished as a gift in itself.


    Gifts in particular can often involve not just minutes but days or even weeks of thought - let alone the effort of shopping for just the right thing, the monetary cost, the care in wrapping and choosing a card, and finally the delivery.

    One of the loveliest memories I have is the joy on my children's faces when they received a thank-you card thanking them for their thank- you card sent for a Christmas gift they received. We still laugh about it now and joke about whether they should have sent back a thank-you card, for the thank-you card, for the thank-you card!
  • Wice says
    I was thinking about this and I think that one of the most important things to remember when writing wedding thank you cards, is to make sure that you mention the particular gift. Rather than just saying 'gift' – say, for example, “ beautiful 1,000 thread cotton sheets” - when thanking the person to whom you are writing. I've had thank you cards which made me think that the writer really had no idea what I had given them, they were so vague and general. Their card to me seemed to mean as little as my gift did to them - disrespectful and unappreciative when you have gone to a lot of trouble and/or expense to try to give them something they would love.

    I guess though, I'm as bad an anyone. Much as I try, I've had the same problem at family Christmas gatherings when I haven't been paying attention during gift giving and later can't recall who gave me what. I hate being so unappreciative. I've seen how people's faces light up when you tell them, even six month's later , how you've been enjoying their gift; you just can't do this if you not sure what the gift was.

    Back to wedding gift gripes… the recent practice of having bridesmaids open wedding gifts at the reception absolutely appals me - just so rude; it can only take away some of the pleasure for both the giver and the real recipients. In any case, wherever possible, gifts shouldn’t be brought to the weddin, but delivered to the bride’s home some time during the week before the event. Regardless, if you believe in the the sentiment of gift giving, then bride and groom should always open their gifts themselves (making sure that they have tape to attach cards). The bride should keep a notebook to give the the maid of honour at the wedding who should be at hand to record gift details and givers names. It's so useful to then be able to write in addresses and comments and tick off names when you have sent your thank you letter. It’s a lovely record to keep as well.

    I still have the gift notebook from my wedding (years ago) and it never fails to make me smile when I look at it. Taking any gift, I think of how I've used it, and the people who gave it. I guess that's probably why I hate giving money as a wedding gift – no sentiment involved – no story – it just gets swallowed up into fund for unknown purposes. On the other hand, I have a strange yellow glass bowl from a school friend whom I haven't seen for decades. Every time I use it, I always think of her and wonder how she is getting on. Then there’s the tiny glass vase from one of my ‘tighter’ friends; the gorgeous Edwardian chair from an extravagant one. I even have some jars from a fellow who later became PM of NZ. Gifts are more than just things, they talk to you with the voices of their givers.
  • Wice says
    I was thinking about this and I think that one of the most important things to remember when writing wedding thank you cards, is to make sure that you mention the particular gift. Rather than just saying 'gift' – say, for example, “ beautiful 1,000 thread cotton sheets” - when thanking the person to whom you are writing. I've had thank you cards which made me think that the writer really had no idea what I had given them, they were so vague and general. Their card to me seemed to mean as little as my gift did to them - disrespectful and unappreciative when you have gone to a lot of trouble and/or expense to try to give them something they would love.

    I guess though, I'm as bad an anyone. Much as I try, I've had the same problem at family Christmas gatherings when I haven't been paying attention during gift giving and later can't recall who gave me what. I hate being so unappreciative. I've seen how people's faces light up when you tell them, even six month's later , how you've been enjoying their gift; you just can't do this if you not sure what the gift was.

    Back to wedding gift gripes… the recent practice of having bridesmaids open wedding gifts at the reception absolutely appals me - just so rude; it can only take away some of the pleasure for both the giver and the real recipients. In any case, wherever possible, gifts shouldn’t be brought to the weddin, but delivered to the bride’s home some time during the week before the event. Regardless, if you believe in the the sentiment of gift giving, then bride and groom should always open their gifts themselves (making sure that they have tape to attach cards). The bride should keep a notebook to give the the maid of honour at the wedding who should be at hand to record gift details and givers names. It's so useful to then be able to write in addresses and comments and tick off names when you have sent your thank you letter. It’s a lovely record to keep as well.

    I still have the gift notebook from my wedding (years ago) and it never fails to make me smile when I look at it. Taking any gift, I think of how I've used it, and the people who gave it. I guess that's probably why I hate giving money as a wedding gift – no sentiment involved – no story – it just gets swallowed up into fund for unknown purposes. On the other hand, I have a strange yellow glass bowl from a school friend whom I haven't seen for decades. Every time I use it, I always think of her and wonder how she is getting on. Then there’s the tiny glass vase from one of my ‘tighter’ friends; the gorgeous Edwardian chair from an extravagant one. I even have some jars from a fellow who later became PM of NZ. Gifts are more than just things, they talk to you with the voices of their givers.

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